IRS Representation

In This Issue:

  • You Know You Need Tax Planning If…
  • Al Capone, Aunt Becky, Tax Fraud and You!
    How you can learn from high-profile tax scandals
  • 4 Key Elements of Great Business Books

You Know You Need Tax Planning If…

Effective tax planning helps you make smart decisions now to get the future outcome you desire — but you need to make sure you don’t miss anything. Forget to account for one of these situations and your tax plans will go off the rails in a hurry:

Getting married or divorced.One plus one does not always equal two in the tax world. Marriage means a new tax status, new deduction amounts and income limits, and a potential marriage penalty. The same is true for divorce, but with added complexity. Untangling assets, alimony, child support and dependents are all considerations worthy of discussion.

Growing your family.While bringing home a new child adds expenses to your budget, it also comes with some tax breaks. With a properly executed plan, you can take home the savings now to help offset some of those new costs. If you are adopting, you get an additional tax credit to help with the adoption expenses.

Changing jobs or getting a raise.Earning more money is great, but if you’re not careful, you might be surprised by the tax hit. Each additional dollar you earn gets taxed at your highest tax rate, and might even bump you to the next tax bracket. If you are switching jobs, the change also includes things like new benefit packages to consider.

Buying or selling a house.Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer, you’re moving to your next house, or you’re selling a house, there will be tax implications resulting from the move. Knowing how your taxes will be affected ahead of time will help you make solid financial decisions and avoid surprises. If you’re looking to buy or sell investment property, even more tax issues come into play.

Saving or paying for college.There are so many different college tax breaks, it can be tricky to determine which ones might make the most sense for your situation. These include the American Opportunity Tax Credit, the Lifetime Learning Credit, the Coverdell Education Savings Account, 529 plans and student loan interest deductibility.

Planning for retirement.Everyone needs to plan for retirement, but each situation is different. Some of the factors to keep in mind include employment status, current income, available cash, future earnings and tax rates, retirement age and Social Security. Putting all of these variables into one analysis will paint a clearer picture of your retirement strategy and provide a way forward.

Don’t make the mistake of omitting key details from your tax plan. Call now to schedule a tax-planning meeting.

Al Capone, Aunt Becky, Tax Fraud and You!

How you can learn from high-profile tax scandals

The recent college admission scandal involving Lori Loughlin (who played Aunt Becky in the Full HouseTV series) and others is shedding light on just one way people allegedly cheat on their taxes. Here are examples of some famous people in tax trouble with the IRS and helpful hints to make sure it doesn’t happen to you:

Lori Loughlin and questionable charitable donations.In this case, the IRS would investigate whether payments deducted as charitable contributions on her tax return were really charitable contributions. Regardless of how the legal charges shake out, Loughlin is looking at a potentially large tax bill if the charity she contributed to is stripped of their non-profit status.

Helpful hint:Charitable giving must be to legitimate charitable organizations, for legitimate purposes, and must be reduced by any value received in return.

Al Capone and his illegal earnings.After years of bribing and wriggling his way out of violent crime charges, Capone was charged with 22 counts of tax evasion for not reporting income on illegal activities. He was sentenced to 11 years in prison — some of which were served at Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary in San Francisco.

Helpful hint:ALL income — even if obtained illegally — is taxable.

Wesley Snipes decided not to file his taxes.In 2008, actor Snipes was convicted for not filing tax returns from 1999 to 2001. Among his many arguments, Snipes used the tax protester theory claiming domestic income is not taxable. After jail time, Snipes’ offer in compromise to lower his $23 million tax bill request was shot down by the IRS.

Helpful hint:Exotic tax schemes are actively monitored by the IRS. If it seems to good to be true, it probably is too good to be true and requires a second opinion.

Leona Helmsley faked her business expenses.Helmsley, A famous real estate mogul in the 1980s, had more than $8 million of renovations to her private home billed to one of her hotels so she could deduct the expense on her taxes. After being convicted, Helmsey had to pay back the $8 million and served 18 months in prison.

Helpful hint:Separate business expenses from personal expenses. Open separate bank accounts and never intermingle expenses. The IRS is quick to disallow deductions when personal expenses and business expenses are mixed together.

Pete Rose hid his “likeness” income.Many famous athletes go on to sell autographs, memorabilia and get paid for appearances after they retire from their sport. Rose was no different, but he opted not to report the $354,968 he earned over a four-year period. The result was five months in prison and a $50,000 fine in addition to having to pay back the taxes he tried to avoid.

Helpful hint:Don’t attempt to hide income. With fewer businesses using cash payments, the IRS now can use matching programs to quickly find underreporting problems.

While seeing well-known celebrities in the press for tax trouble makes for interesting reading, there are useful tax lessons for all of us. It provides an opportunity to see how IRS employees think and what they are reviewing.

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